Site Update: Cloudflare

The best way for me to learn about a certain technology is to play with it myself. CloudFlare is one such technology that I have been vaguely aware of, but never quite sure of what it was. So I decided to move this site to CloudFlare to see how it stacks up with the current all-AWS deployment (S3, CloudFront, Route53).

Let me be clear - I have been happy with the CloudFront and Route53 services. This move to CloudFlare was only to satisfy an intellectual curiosity, and if I’m unhappy with CloudFlare, I’ll return to CloudFront and Route53 without reservation.

So, if you’re reading this, then that means the move to CloudFlare was successful! You can see this site’s now using CloudFlare DNS as well with:

$ dig -t ns chrislockard.net
...

;; ANSWER SECTION:
chrislockard.net.	86400	IN	NS	ali.ns.cloudflare.com.
chrislockard.net.	86400	IN	NS	andy.ns.cloudflare.com.

;; ADDITIONAL SECTION:
ali.ns.cloudflare.com.	3081	IN	A	173.245.58.59
ali.ns.cloudflare.com.	3391	IN	AAAA	2606:4700:50::adf5:3a3b
andy.ns.cloudflare.com.	2305	IN	A	173.245.59.101
andy.ns.cloudflare.com.	2376	IN	AAAA	2606:4700:58::adf5:3b65
...

A note on cookies

I strive for this site to respect your privacy to the fullest extent possible. My only reservation about CloudFlare after using it for three days is that it sets the _cfduid cookie in your browser. This cookie helps CloudFlare detect malicious visitors to this website and *does not allow cross-site tracking of visitors, does not follow users from site to site by merging various _cfduid identifiers into a profile, nor does it correspond to any user ID on this website

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